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Category Archives: Customer Insight

Businesses are from Mars and customers are from Venus

By | Branding, Customer experience, Customer Insight, Thoughtleadership and Content Marketing, Value Proposition | No Comments

A major issue all businesses face is that of changing their internal measures and focus from that of what they need to be successful to that of thinking like their customers so they can solve their problems better and deliver a superior experience. These mindsets are in conflict and the internal pressures of running a business often give way to only thinking about costs and sales which creates less visibility to trying to innovate, look at customer aspirations and developing a truly differentiated experience.

It is really a catch22. The more internal a company becomes, the more internal measures then I propose the more likely they are to deliver a vanilla or commoditised customer experience and as such likely to resort to cost cutting. On the other hand the more innovative, customer centric and in-touch with their customers a company is the more differentiated and likely they are to create memorable experiences for customers and thus the more they can charge. This video featuring Lior Arussy, Strativity Group President explains it well.

How do we reconcile the external forces of running our businesses and being customer centric?

Sample: Principles of Customer Experience from Strativity Group on Vimeo.

Understanding and mapping out the customer buying path or touch points with your team is a good starting point.

Effective Marketing: It’s simple, just be helpful!

By | customer centric marketing, Customer experience, Customer Insight | No Comments

Marketing your business can be really easy. You just need to be helpful. I always thought there was no real skill in being helpful, but maybe being able to think about what your customers want and need during their experience with you is a hard thing for business owners. Those businesses that are putting more energy into thinking like their customers are gaining a competitive advantage and creating or disrupting current markets for significant growth; e.g Uber.

Currently I am on holidays in sunny Gold Coast with my family and have come across a couple of great examples of how you can be helpful and leave a laSlide1sting impression. At the local Coles there was a new guide on the trolley which was a fantastic help for a shopper like me that isn’t familiar with the store layout (every Coles layout is different, right yes we hate that). In the Gold Coast I am sure that they have a lot of holiday shoppers and so adapting the trolley with this guide, a quick overview of how to find exactly what you need in this Coles store was incredibly helpful.

When we checked into our Hotel where we are staying the lovely Kaye gave us a couple of vouchers for cheaper meals at the local RSL and not only was that unexpected but very thoughtful. Today it is so much more about showing that you understand the customer you are serving or trying to serve and less about what you have as a product or service.

nivea-solar-chargerSkincare brand Nivea placed solar panelled chargers in Brazilian magazines. Lucky beach-goers can charge their phone while they sunbathe. There is nothing better than a free iphone recharge when your battery is down to 8%! Recharge Bar chargebarChargebar is a new company that has made a business by providing this service at airports, cafes and shopping centres based on the premise that being able to recharge can really be appreciated by the consumer.

Maybe it is time to map out your customer journey and see how you can provide some more helpful steps in their experience, it might just be the best marketing dollars you have ever spent!

 

Talk to Humans

By | Content Marketing, Customer Insight | No Comments

Lesson learnedWhen was the last time you talked with your customers? It sounds simple but why do so many small businesses make assumptions? This book by Giff Constaple and illustrated by my fav cartoonist Tom Fishburne answers some of those key assumptions in Talking to Humans. So do yourself a favour, before you invest in marketing tactics please do a simple customer survey or better still pick up the phone and ask your customers why they decided to buy from you. And while you are at it, ask your staff why they work for you and see if you can uncover your true value proposition. This is the starting point for growing a successful business.

Download book here.

Talk to humans

What’s in a name?

By | customer centric marketing, Customer Insight, Customer Insight | No Comments

TolunaThis week I have been in a branding workshop with a client and we have been contemplating changing the name of their company. I would love some feedback in this survey question to help us decide. Getting feedback from small business owners that is honest, quick and to the point is so valuable. I would really appreciate your insights! The tool I used is Toluna’s Quick Surveys. It is an awesome tool for canvassing feedback quickly via crowd sourcing.

Feedback on a name

Survey Feedback on a name – urgent!

I’m the customer and I don’t have to do anything.

By | branding, customer centric marketing, Customer Insight | No Comments

Now it is touted that up to 85% of the buyers journey is done without you, the seller. As the customer I don’t have to do anything.buyers journey

“In fact, the marketer who really understands how the game is played now knows that marketing, and really all business, has been flipped around — the customer is now in control of what they hear, where they hear it and whether or not they choose to engage. They are conducting their own research before making purchases, their ability to talk about your brand has an almost unlimited reach, and as a marketer it’s imperative to understand how your audience wants to engage.” Marketingdrive.com

Here is a great video from Brand Matters about how a brand can be human:

What are you doing to personalise and engage with your customers?

Ask your customers good questions

By | customer centric marketing, Customer Insight | No Comments

The old customer survey. It is coming up more and more frequently lately as businesses now surveyunderstand the power of listening to their customers. Or maybe they haven’t been listening and now are feeling the power of customers ignoring their every attempt to “push” at trying to gain attention.


Here are some key questions to consider when designing a survey.

1. Make it short

The more questions the more annoying for the customer and it might not actually assist them communicating honestly about what you need to know. If your survey takes more than 8 minutes expect a high abandon rate. So small number of highly focused question with questions that are relevant to your customers.

2. Personal

If possible make the survey dynamic. That is use technology to show only the fields that your customer needs to see. Pre-populate.

3. Open questionsfaces

Scale questions have their place but a rating of 1-10 doesn’t allow you to uncover issues that you might not have considered. Let customers identify exactly what they want to communicate to you in their own words.

4. Right format

Surveys can be via telephone, email, face to face on your website etc. The best results I find is from email as long as your list is clean and the timing of the email convenient. (not first thing Monday morning). However taking a email campaign and posting it to your Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn communities can also be very effective.

5. Feedback

If you give customers access to the survey results (I do a report immediately) then they are more likely to fill it in. Customers want to feel heard and part of a larger solution. Letting customers know they matter and you are taking action is vital. While 95% of companies collect customer feedback only 5% tell customers what they’ve done with it.(Source: clarabridge.com)

6.Feedback Always OnCRM11-300x223

Customers are talking about your products and services all the time. They review, share opinions online and ask questions of their valued communities like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and review sites. Collecting and monitoring these feeds will give you real time date that may identify trends that consolidate your survey findings.

7. Share the results with customers and employees

To improve your customer experience you need to improve your employee’s experience. To do this with customer data is a powerful strategy and unities everyone behind the customer. Prioritising actions out of surveys and feedback help employees feel empowered and engaged.

8. Create a Customer and Employee Dashboard

Measuring key factors that impact customer and employee satisfaction creates accountability and drives change. It doesn’t have to be the Net Promoter Score but it should be something that is meaningful and enhances your brand’s reputation.

For every customer complaint, 26 others remain silent. (source clarabridge.com)

Guide to customer surveys.

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